Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Eridanus Supervoid and Multiverse

WMAP cold spot
wikimedia
Why Universe, why not Multiverse?

Perhaps!
The Eridanus Supervoid is the largest supervoid (an area of the universe devoid of galaxies) discovered as of 2007. At a diameter of about one billion light years it is much larger than any other known void and represents a challenge for current theories of the origins of the universe to explain.

It was discovered by linking a "cold spot" in the cosmic microwave background to an absence of radio galaxies in data of the United States National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array Sky Survey. There is some speculation that the void may be due to quantum entanglement between our universe and another.
wikipedia

Typically, the largest fluctuations of the primordial CMB temperature occur on angular scales of about 1°. Thus a cold region as large as the "cold spot" appears very unlikely, given generally accepted theoretical models.

Various alternative explanations exist, including a so-called Eridanus Supervoid or Great Void. This would be an extremely large region of the universe, roughly 150 Mpc or 500 million light-years across, at redshift , containing a density of matter much smaller than the average density at that redshift. Such a void would affect the observed CMB via the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.

If a comparable supervoid did exist, it would be one of the largest structures in the observable Universe.
wikipedia

If you are following me this blog on Space Theology we have just concluded a wonderful tour to the limits of the observable Universe with the help of the Hayden Planetarium Digital Universe Atlas. Brian Abbott explains in the Guide Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and we can admire in Partiview a 3D model of the WMAP data.

And now, right away after that, we hit the possibility of the existence of Multiverse as an explanation to an enormous "cold spot" noted the direction of the Eridanus (River Po) constellation. Some have explained this void of anything as a quantum entanglement between our universe and another.

Our trip to space exploration is getting more and more grandiose!

16 comments:

  1. The thought of things in our Universe as massive as that is utterly...mind boggling, and on top of that, its supposed to be the point in where our Universe and another overlap? Its hard to even wrap your mind around it. Too bad man kind will most likely never get there. At least, not unless we develop some kind of exponentially powerful energy source to power a space vessel and have it go at least as fast as the speed of light. It would be divinely awesome in the literal sense to enter another Universe. Who knows what we would find? And all this is coming from some 14 year old nobody. My generation will revolutionize science as we know it. I can feel it.

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    1. "My generation will revolutionize science as we know it. I can feel it."

      Sure!

      If all goes well the NASA estimated launch date for James Webb Space Telescope in 2018 will hold and you will be 19 years old.

      "Webb will find the first galaxies that formed in the early Universe, connecting the Big Bang to our own Milky Way Galaxy. Webb will peer through dusty clouds to see stars forming planetary systems, connecting the Milky Way to our own Solar System. Webb's instruments will be designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, with some capability in the visible range.

      Webb will have a large mirror, 6.5 meters (21.3 feet) in diameter and a sunshield the size of a tennis court. Both the mirror and sunshade won't fit onto a rocket fully open, so both will fold up and open once Webb is in outer space. Webb will reside in an orbit about 1.5 million km (1 million miles) from the Earth."

      Worth waiting for!

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  2. Interesting article !

    Is that "entanglement" with another universe somehow related to the amount of dark matter? (Extremely small number that Nobel prize winners discovered)

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  3. I dare to say that nobody knows. The discovery of a "cold spot" in microwave radiation is a challenge to science and alternative explanations exist.
    Your question is made even more difficult as it includes the term "dark matter" - for this huge part of Universe (or Multiverse) is not dark as "lacking light" but dark as "we do not know what it is" darkness i.e. our lack of understanding.

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  4. Mind blowing stuff and far to complex for me. What exactly is a Quasar?

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    1. Hi Chris,

      quoting those wiser than me:
      "While the nature of these objects was controversial until as recently as the early 1980s, there is now a scientific consensus that a quasar is a compact region in the center of a massive galaxy, that surrounds its central supermassive black hole.

      Its size is 10–10,000 times the Schwarzschild radius of the black hole.

      The quasar is powered by an accretion disc around the black hole."
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasar

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  5. Could this "cold spot" possibly be a universe so dense and so packed with matter that our instruments just read it as "dead" or as a "cold spot"?

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    1. BBC Science reporter Quentin Cooper is actively following developments on Laura's and her colleagues 2011 work on Planck results.
      For more information see his news summary a week ago
      http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20130610-mind-bending-multiverse-mysteries
      and his interview with Lee Smolin (30 min) in
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01snlsw

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  6. Greetings, I have predicted existence of this "cold spot" in 2010 ... regardless the fact it´s been discovered yet in 2007 by a chance. I didn´t know about it that time. If I am right, I know what it is and I will explain you. For now, if I´m right again, you should know it´s going to be found to be not only cold, but very cold and once you get to super-resolution, you find there absolutely black spot, with absolute zero of temperature. Good luck and enjoy your future founds.

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    1. Hi Ondřej and thank you for encouraging me to study more.

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  7. ohh my god.........this article is exactly what i was looking for..! i like things that make me confused..and make me study more until i found all the answers to my questions..tnx for this article..

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    1. Hi Ian, as you can see this blog is a kind of guide pointing at internet resources where you can get much more information about the subjects. The problem is the tsunami of data we are facing and how to integrate it in our view of the world. For me personally faith in God the Creater, the God of Israel, brings everything, microcosmos, macrocosmos, life, together, because He is One.

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  8. Way to ruin a good scientific article with faith nonsense

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    1. Thank you for your comment. You bring the Big Gun "nonsense" without noticing that here it is void of any meaningful content. The context in this blog is not someone's faith but the Scriptures.

      Great are the works of the Lord;
      they are pondered by all who delight in them.
      Glorious and majestic are his deeds,
      and his righteousness endures forever.
      Psalm 111:2-3

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  9. I wanna go to the Multiverse!

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  10. where were the know it alls,when god set the universe on its foundation.

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